Parade magazine 1938 dating tips

The cloud that brought devastation to the Syrian town of Khan Sheikhoun had no smell and affected even those who came into contact with the dead, indicating it was sarin, a chemical compound created by the Nazis The cloud that brought such devastation to the Syrian town of Khan Sheikhoun had no smell and affected even those who came into contact with the dead, indicating it was sarin gas – a chemical compound developed by the Nazis and 26 times more deadly than cyanide.

Medical charity Medicins Sans Frontieres said its doctors treated victims with dilated pupils, muscle spasms and involuntary defecation – symptoms ‘consistent with exposure to neuro-toxic agents such as sarin’.

The World Health Organisation said the victims appeared to have been exposed to a ‘nerve agent’.

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You will be more than happy that this advise is no longer tolerated in modern society but it highlights the meter of the time well and is simply hilarious!This a genuine article from a 1938 publication of Parade Magazine on dating tips for the “modern” women.Lungs secrete fluid to try to repel the gas, making victims foam at the mouth with blood-flecked discharges.Many suffer from a medical condition known as SLUDGE, which stands for Salivation, Lacrimation (tears), Urination, Defecation, Gastrointestinal distress and Emesis (vomiting).The chemist in charge of the project initially thought he had failed, because the compound he had created was too deadly to animal and human life to use in agriculture.

But that is exactly what appealed to Adolf Hitler, whose weapons division took over the project.

Having failed to make powerful insecticides from fluoride, he decided to mix phosphorus with cyanide.

As well as killing all insects, tests on animals proved astonishing. Yet Schrader thought he had failed in his quest because the substance could not be used in agriculture – and help feed Hitler’s armies – because it was so toxic. A keen military historian, he knew Germany had started what became known as the ‘chemists’ war’ on April 22, 1915, when chlorine gas was fired at French soldiers in the trenches.

In 1953, Maddison was offered three days’ leave and 15 shillings for agreeing to take part in the test, which was designed to discover what effects dripping sarin on clothing had.

The substance is liquid until it reaches 150 degrees C, whereupon, when fired by a shell, the explosion turns it into gas.

Besides, how many of those did you actually ever find useful?